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Licensing Questions

Please note that when you submit your original music for distribution at HearYou Music, you are giving us your legally-binding word that you have all necessary rights required for distribution of that content, for both the sound recording and the underlying song. You are responsible to ensure that you have all necessary rights before submitting any of your music for distribution with us. Please carefully review the HearYou Music agreement which you sign and think carefully about the rights which you grant to us under its terms and conditions – do you have all the necessary rights to use, upload and sell your music? If you have any doubts as to whether you have the necessary rights for a particular track, please do not submit it to HearYou Music. Please note that we cannot provide you with legal advice and that you need to consult an attorney for specific advice. Please note that in certain cases where HearYou Music is made aware of a potential copyright issue, HearYou Music might ask you to re-confirm your rights to use the content in question and/or to provide documentation as evidence of those rights. If you are unable to provide documentation that verifies your rights, we may not allow you to distribute that content. NOTE THAT using third-party content without authorization can carry significant penalties, including (but not limited to) loss of your HearYou Music account as well as civil and criminal penalties for copyright infringement should a copyright owner decide to pursue action against you. And remember that all content you submit through your HearYou Music account – including your artist biography, artist image and album art–must be entirely original, unless you have authorization to use them. We can assist you in getting the mechanical license (for cover songs) for an additional fee.

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Synchronization License (Synch License) – This method of licensing refers to music that is going to be paired with some form of visual media. It has a broad range of uses, including TV commercials, studio films, streaming advertisements, personal films, internal communications, and more. We will take care of this through our publishing companies.
Mechanical License – A mechanical license is needed for any physical reproduction of an artist’s work. Primarily this refers to the manufacturing of CDs or distribution of music in any tangible form. Artists, aka copyright holders, will have agreements with record labels, distributors, and publishers on the mechanical terms of their music.
Master License – Master licenses are a bit more complex than most others, in that they’re similar to sync licenses but not quite as broad-ranging. A master right is held by the person who owns the recording of a song. The master license gives the user permission to use a pre-recorded version of a song in a visual or audio project, but does not allow a user to re-record a song for a project (i.e. to cover or edit a song).
Public Performance License – While ‘performance’ may be a limiting term, it applies generally to any broadcast of an artist’s work. This includes businesses who play music in their store, jukeboxes, or any other form of public performance — all the way up to concerts. Performing rights organizations (PROs) such as BMI, SESAC, and ASCAP generally manage public performance licenses and issue music royalties to artists on a per-use basis.
Print Rights License – This license refers to the physical copy of the sheet music that an artist has created. It’s needed when someone prints a sheet music compilation, or any time the sheet music of copyrighted work is reproduced.
Theatrical License – Also a very specific form of written permission, theatrical licenses are very common in the theater industry. The license is required any time a copyrighted work is performed on-stage in front of an audience.

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ES, you need FULL PERMISSION to do this!You must own the copyright for the sound recordings or have the authority or permission from the owner(s).If you didn’t write the song (composition), it’s OK, but you must find out who the copyright owner(s) is/are, and pay the publisher their mechanical royalties based on your download/sales activity.If you have samples in your music, they must be legally cleared and paid-for. No ‘mix tapes’ of other people’s music, even if you are mixing in your own music.It’s very important that you have all the rights and permissions! Files distributed online are monitored very carefully by lawyers. You can’t just ‘get away with it’ so do everything thoroughly and legit. We will not be held legally liable for any legal action against you for not making sure this is taken care of. We can assist you in obtaining mechanical licenses for cover songs. Please refer to our Mechanical License page for more information on this.

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